Angelica Seeds

Angelica Seeds

Supplied by the inspiring duo at Aweside agro-ecological farm in East Sussex

Guest Blog by Gee Derrick

You had chance to taste Angelica flowers in the last box, and now the seeds are ready for harvest.

Suggested Use:

Boil 10-12 seeds for 10 minutes to make a delicious and aromatic tea

Add the seeds to roasted root veg, meats, soups or stews - use in place of fennel seeds in any recipe. 

This Angelica (Angelica Archangelica) is the cultivated variety, which also goes by the names of Angelica glauca, European Angelica, parnachoraka, wild celery, Archangel or Holy Ghost.

This tall, statuesque biennial, is wonderfully aromatic with a pungent, sweet smell and taste.

Historically, Angelica was considered a powerful protective herb. It was so highly esteemed that it was called the ‘Root of the Holy Ghost’. It’s been used as an antidote to poison and a remedy for infectious diseases including the plague.

Angelica is linked, in Christian mythology, with the springtime festival of the Annunciation. It was considered to be under the protection of Michael the Archangel because it blooms on his feast day -8 May-, in the old Julian calendar.

During the 16th and 17th century, Angelica was combined with other herbs to make Carmelite water, a medieval drink thought to promote longevity and relaxation, to cure headaches and protect against evil forces.

In France, seeds have been used in a variety of liquors, with the most well known being Benedictine, gin and Chartreuse. 

By Gee Derrick

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